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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

1742]
To Horace Mann
167
one of his own countrymen went and told him of it in the House. The old man, who looked like Lazarus at his resuscitation, bore it with great resolution, and said, he knew why he was told of it, but when he thought his country in danger, he would not go away. As he is so near death, that it is indifferent to him whether he died two thousand years ago or to-morrow, it is unlucky for him not to have lived when such insensibility would have been a Eoman virtue.
There are no arts, no menaces, which the Opposition do not practise. They have threatened one gentleman to have a reversion cut off from his son, unless he will vote with them. To Totness there came a letter to the mayor from the Prince, and signed by two of his lords, to recommend a candidate in opposition to the Solicitor-General16. The mayor sent the letter to Sir Eobert. They have turned the Scotch to the best account. There is a young Oswald17, who had engaged to Sir E. but has voted against us. Sir B. sent a friend to reproach him; the moment the gentleman who had engaged for him came into the room, Oswald said, < You had like to have led me into a fine error! did you not tell me that Sir E. would have the majority ?'
When the debate was over, Mr. Pulteney owned that he had never heard so, fine a debate on our side; and said to Sir Eobert, ' Well, nobody can do what you can !' ' Yes,' replied Sir E. ' Yonge did better.' Mr. Pulteney answered, 'It was fine, but not of that weight with what you said.' They all allow it j and now their plan is to persuade Sir Eobert to retire with honour. All that evening there was a report about the town, that he and my uncle were to be sent to the Tower, and people hired windows in the City
16 John   (afterwards   Sir   John)        17 James Oswald, afterwards one
Strange (1696-1754), M.P. for West     of the Commissioners of Trade and
Looe;   Solicitor-General,   1737-42;     Plantations.     WalpoU.. — M.P.   for
Master of the Bolls, 1749-52.                 Kirkaldy Burghs; d. 1769.